Some Info About Paul Revere Ware

This blog is to add information on various Revere Ware that ordinarily I would not include in the information when I am selling them.  Some people don’t want to read all that extra stuff, but if you do, I’ll share some things I think I know about Paul Revere Ware here.

This special “High-End” cookware was produced in Oneonta, Alabama, about 50 miles NE of Birmingham.   Production began about 1967, right about the time Revere converted their “process patent” heavier copper bottom cookware to a somewhat lighter style, and dropped the “process patent” logo.   This Paul Revere Ware was made from a solid copper sheet and a solid stainless steel sheet bonded together with pressure, unlike the Revere Ware copper bottom pans, which were a stainless steel sheet with an electroplated layer of copper.

When America’s Bicentennial came around 9 years later in 1976, this line of cookware was stamped with Paul Revere’s signature and 1776-1976 on the bottom.  They produced the Bicentennial version for a couple of years, and then dropped the 1776-1976  from the logo, and kept the signature and the “1801″.  6 years later, Revere Copper & Brass (the original company) filed for chapter 11 bankruptcy.     4 years after that, around 1986, the Oneonta plant was closed.

This special Paul Revere Line was so beautiful, (and still is) that many people hesitated to actually use it on the stove, and simply hung it on the wall for decoration.  Eventually they might have taken it down and stored it in a box with some other pans, causing a few storage marks, etc.  Lots of it has never been cooked in, even though it is an excellent heavy-duty line of cookware.

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4 thoughts on “Some Info About Paul Revere Ware

    1. paulrevereware Post author

      Anyone who comes across this is welcome to help me out on this. :). From what I understand, Mauviel (made in france) cookware comes in 2.5mm thickness and a thinner line, 1.5mm. Falk (made in belgium) comes only in 2.5mm as far as I know. Both are top of the line, and which wins out seems to depend on who you talk to. The Paul revereware line is nothing like this. They copied the French by calling their frying pans “French chef” saute pans! I can’t find any actual data, but I measured one of mine, and the entire thickness of the pan is only about 2mm, including the stainless. It looks to be about equal parts stainless and copper, which would make the copper only 1mm thick, but can’t tell for sure.

      I understand that mauviel cookware is tin lined, rather than stainless. Tin is softer, so there may be that advantage for any other cookware that is stainless lined and can take more utensil wear and tear. I don’t know much about Falk other than my grandma wouldn’t have even known what it was.

      Perhaps the appeal of all lines of Revere Ware is that for a struggling USA over the years, it was here, made here, and used here by everyone’s grandma, and possibly helped employ their grandpa in some way. Maybe the name itself reminds us of how America came to be. All I really know is that my grandma cooked in it, my mom still cooks in it, and they don’t make it here in the USA anymore.

      Reply
    1. paulrevereware Post author

      I think it would depend on the condition, of course, and I suppose also on how many people are looking for this. As I collected my set, I kept a better one when I found it and sold off the others on eBay. I get quite a good price for a good used piece, but I’ve never sold a set. Every piece I sell (used) for at least $100, some of them $200, but I don’t sell them fast. Occasionally I see the unused ones for sale, and they don’t seem to bring a huge amount. Some of these pieces you never see at all, so I guess they didn’t make them very often. I’d like to think they are worth a lot! Look on eBay and see what you think on price, based upon what they are selling for there.

      Reply

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